3D Corner Dremel 3D Comes to a Best Buy Store Near You

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The Dremel 3D Builder is now in 50 select Best Buy stores across the United States! Find out where you can go to see it in action. 

Earlier this month, Dremel partnered with Best Buy to set up 50 in-store displays to demonstrate both 3D printing and Dremel 3D Idea Builder capabilities. Be sure to also stop by the combined Sprout by HP and Dremel 3D display for the full 3D-printing experience. 

Please call your local Best Buy store to check for product availability. Store Locator 

You can also purchase the Dremel 3D Idea Builder from Best Buy Online.

 

Meet Shaun Crockett, Maker in Residence

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Being a Maker means being creative and versatile and embracing new challenges. This month's featured Maker has all three of those qualities in spades. Meet Shaun Crockett, Maker in Residence. 

Tell us a little about your background, Shaun. How did you get into making? 

I was raised in a very hands-on family. My dad and mom were always tackling projects. They did everything from home remodeling to automotive repair. They always taught me not to be afraid of hard work. And it rubbed off on me for sure. I started making projects from my dad's scrap wood and never looked back. 

Being able to bring my ideas to life has really driven me in many ways. I went to college and then started working in advertising. It's been a perfect choice for me. I get to solve problems using creative thinking and surround myself with passionate, creative people. 

What inspires you? 

My inspiration comes from being able to turn ideas into reality. I'm not afraid to fail, and that has been critical in creating. I love trying new things. The process to create is almost as important as the end product. If I mess up and ruin a piece, I learn from it. 

Being a Maker also forces you to make decisions. You must commit. I think this is a great lesson in life. Too many people wonder about the outcome so much that they never end up doing. I keep a list of projects I want to do—if I don't know how to do them, I learn. 

The digital age has created a vast information resource that can show you how to do just about anything. Chances are there's a YouTube video showing you an example. 

Since becoming a Dremel Maker in Residence, have you branched out and experimented with any new tools? 

I use computers every day for my job. This gave me a jump start with basic graphic interfaces. I started doing online tutorials for several CAD programs and went immediately to work with the 3D Idea Builder. It's the perfect tool for blending the digital and physical world. I've been modeling and printing tons of stuff. I am still learning and my projects have been fairly simple, but it has really got my brain thinking about the opportunity it presents. Along with the 3D Idea Builder, the 8220 Rotary Tool has been my go-to tool. Since it's cordless, it's so easy to just pick it up and immediately go to work. I can take it anywhere, and it packs the power to get the job done. 

What sort of projects are you working on right now? 

One of my projects I submitted for the Makers in Residence contest was a handmade knife I built from a reclaimed shop file. I've been continuing to explore projects like that, but with new metal options and handle materials. I really like combining different mediums—wood, metal, glass, electronics—everything is fair game. It all comes down to seeing the beauty and potential of each object. 

To see more work from Shaun and the rest of the Makers in Residence, follow Dremel on Facebook

The 2015 Dremel Holiday Gift Guide Dremel Makes Happy Holidays

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The holiday season is in full swing, and we know you've got a Maker or two on your shopping list. Finding the perfect gift can be tough, so we're here to help with our 2015 holiday gift guide.

The Dremel 4200 Rotary Tool

 

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Great For: Everyone

There should be one item already at the top of your gift list: the Dremel 4200 rotary tool. Whether you're sanding wood, etching glass, sharpening shears, or cutting metal, every Maker's home needs a reliable rotary tool. The unbeatable versatility of the 4200 and the EZ Change accessory mechanism mean that you can switch effortlessly between grinding, sanding, polishing, engraving, and cutting. We also love the variable speed dial which allows you to switch from 5,000 RPM all the way up to 35,000 RPM to meet the needs of your project.

The Dremel US40 Ultra-Saw and The Dremel MM40-05 Multi-Max

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Great For: The Home Improvement Enthusiast

If you have an advanced DIYer or contractor on your shopping list, the Dremel Ultra-Saw and Multi-Max Oscillating Tool make great stocking stuffers (assuming you've got an extra-large, of course). The Ultra-Saw takes on difficult cuts with precision and ease through tough materials like metal, tile, plastic, masonry, and wood. Beyond its impressive power, advanced DIYers and home improvement pros will also appreciate its compact size and clear line of sight for truly clean, efficient cutting. Like every Dremel tool, the Ultra-Saw is all about versatility. Surfacing, cutting (straight or plunge), and even flush cutting are a breeze.

The MM40-05 is the premier Dremel oscillating tool. The powerful 3.8 Amp motor means the MM40-05 is among the most powerful oscillating tools in its class. That power is paired with an extra-wide 3.2-degree angle of oscillation to improve the efficiency of your cuts. It's also surprisingly lightweight and comfortable, and the Tool-less Quick Lock accessory change system lets you switch between accessories with a simple turn of a lever. If the Maker on your list loves remodeling, repairing, and restoring things around the home, a Multi-Max Oscillating Tool is a must-own.

The Dremel VersaTip Model 2000-01 Butane Soldering Torch

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Great For: Crafters and Hobbyists

The VersaTip is a cordless butane soldering iron and torch that's great for precision craft projects and pyrography. The VersaTip is perfect for creating intricate, decorative burns in wood and leather. It also doubles as tool for shrinking, soldering, and hot-cutting. If you know a Maker who's looking to dive headfirst into creating unique art projects, the VersaTip should be on your holiday shopping list.

The Dremel VRT-1 Vacuum Powered Rotary Tool

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Great For: The Mess Maker

Keeping your workspace clean when you're working with messy materials like wood and glass can be tough. One thing that every Maker wants for the holidays is to spend more time making and less time cleaning up. The VRT-1 transforms your wet/dry shop vacuum into a versatile turbine-powered rotary tool. The suction of the vacuum powers the rotary tool and cleans debris at the same time to help keep dusty projects under control. Best of all, the VRT-1 is compatible with most Dremel rotary tool accessories.

The Dremel 3D Idea Builder

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Great For: Millennial Makers and Families

The 3D Idea Builder was designed from the ground up to bring your brilliant ideas to life and make 3D printing more accessible. The full-color touch screen, easy setup, and robust software allow you to jump right in and start creating anything, from fun toys and works of art to functional everyday items. The only limitation is your own imagination. We've already highlighted some of the Makers who have been doing incredible things with the 3D Idea Builder, and every month we're sharing more 3D project templates with the Maker community. If you're shopping for someone with an interest in science and design, or just someone who wants to create something they never thought was possible, the 3D Idea Builder is a fantastic gift.

 

3D Corner: Build Your own Modular Mars Habitat Model

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Our friend Jon over at Instructables was inspired by the Space X Mars One habitat and decided to harness the power of the 3D Idea Builder to create his own miniature model. The model is fully modular, just like the real thing, which means you can use Jon's template to create an entire mini-Mars colony.


For step-by-step instructions for building the Modular Mars Habitat, click here.

For more information on the Dremel 3D Idea Builder, click here.

Meet Sean Harrington, Maker in Residence

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Last month, we gave you a quick look at the winners of our Maker in Residence competition. This month, you'll get to know one of them a little better. Meet Sean Harrington, our Maker of the Month, and learn how he's making a difference. 

Some Makers channel their creative energy into mastering a single craft. Sean Harrington is a little different. He's a jack-of-all-trades and a lifelong learner who's always looking for new problems to solve. 

Sean first became interested in making when he was in high school. He didn't have access to a wood shop, so instead he took drafting courses and began building props for the school's theatrical productions. Sean's love of the theater continued into his adult life and has been a great way for him to use his Maker skills to give back to the community. When a local theater secured the rights to perform the musical Avenue Q, he spent over a year building the puppets for the production by attaching papier-mâché to foam figures molded with a Dremel rotary tool. Sean's gone on to create even bigger feats of Maker engineering, including a Chitty Chitty Bang Bang car molded out of Styrofoam tubing and wrapped in resin-laminated carbon fiber. The result was a full-sized car (complete with working LED lights) that could support three adults and miraculously only weighed 70 pounds. 

Sean says that he enjoys "any project where I can do something I've never done before." With his unique and ambitious body of work, it seems like he's interested in doing things no one has done before. 

Recently, Sean's been learning the ins and outs of the Dremel 3D Idea Builder for a Maker in Residence project we'll be sharing with you in the coming months. Until then, you can follow Dremel on Facebook for more Maker in Residence updates, and check out Sean's blog for more of his work. 

The New Dremel Universal Accessories Take Versatility to the Next Level

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If you're not looking for a new oscillating tool right now, we've still got you covered. The new Universal Multi-Tool accessories are the first truly universal oscillating accessory interface; no adapter needed.

This month we're introducing an industry first: Universal, adaptor-less, oscillating tool blades. The new Dremel Universal direct-fit accessories speak for themselves. It's the high quality, flush cut Dremel blade you love, ready to pair with your Dremel oscillating tool or any oscillating tool from our competitors.

The new Dremel Universal Multi-Max accessories (MSRP $13.99-$19.99) are available now.

For more information, check out the MM485U, MM480U and MM482U on the Dremel website.
 

The Next Generation of Multi-Max Tools Amp Up the Power

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When we designed the next generation Dremel Multi-Max series, we asked ourselves "What are Makers, contractors and DIY weekend warriors looking for in an oscillating tool?" The answer was simple. More power. More efficiency. More versatility. We love a challenge, so we delivered the best Multi-Max series yet.

The Dremel Multi-Max series gives you all the features and performance you'd expect from the Dremel brand with the added bonus of unparalleled versatility. The MM30 features a convenient on-tool integrated wrench making accessory changes fast and there's no lost wrench to find. The MM40 and MM45 both come with our patented Quick Lock tool free accessory change system, which makes switching between the broad range of Multi-Max accessories simple and fast. All three tools have the innovative magnetic accessory interface making accessory changes easy because it holds the accessory in place so you don't have to.

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The improved Multi-Max series isn't just easy and efficient to use, it also happens to be one of the most powerful oscillating tool series available. The MM30 has been amped-up from 2.5 amps to 3.3 amps, the MM40 ups the power from 3.0 amps to an impressive 3.8 amps. If you need even more power to tackle the toughest jobs, the MM45 kicks things up another notch to a staggering 4.0 amps from 3.5 amps. That power is paired with an extra-wide 3.2-degree angle of oscillation, which makes the Multi-Max series some of the fastest DIY tools in their class. Grinding, cutting, sanding—whatever your DIY project demands, the Multi-Max makes it quick and easy.

The next generation of Multi-Max tools (MSRP $99-$129 USD) are available now.

For more information, visit www.dremel.com.

Check out What Dremel Has in Store for World Maker Faire in NYC

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Last year World Maker Faire in New York played host to more than 800 Makers and 85,000 attendees. This year's celebration of creativity and DIY ingenuity was just as big.

Visitors had the opportunity to build their own micro derby car with the help of the Dremel 8050 Micro cordless rotary tool and the 3D Idea Builder. We were excited to not only demonstrate the power of 3D printing, but also how to bring creations to life. Thanks to a partnership with HP, attendees were able to digitally manipulate their derby cars with the incredible HP Sprout. By combining the Sprout and the 3D Idea Builder, we created an easy to use, all-in-one 3D print-and-play solution. Your only limitation is your own boundless creativity.

We also had two inspiring Makers on hand to give live demonstrations while showing off the power of our Dremel tools. Paul Niemeyer created some incredible wooden signs and Hank Robinson wowed attendees by engraving car hoods.

In addition, we announced the much-anticipated winners of the Dremel Maker-in-Residence contest. These Makers, who embody the passion, enthusiasm and DIY expertise of the Maker movement, will have the opportunity to collaborate directly with Dremel and take home an amazing assortment of prizes including the Dremel 3D Idea Builder and Sprout by HP.

Follow more about our experience at World Maker Faire and our Dremel Chief Makers on the Dremel Facebook Page.

Makers Use the 3D Idea Builder to Take Art into Uncharted Territory

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Meet Jessica and Jesse. They use the 3D Idea Builder to bring art, science and nature together to make one-of-a-kind, custom designs. This is their story.

 

For more information on the Dremel 3D Idea Builder, visit https://3dprinter.dremel.com/

To learn more about Nervous System, click here

Get the New Filament Color for Free Before It Launches

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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and we're showing our support with the limited release of a pink filament color for the Dremel 3D Idea Builder before it launches later this year. We want our fans and Makers across the country to show their support as well, which is why we have an incredible offer for you.

In recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Dremel is giving out a free spool of our not-yet-released pink filament to anyone in the continental United States who registers their 3D Idea Builder on the Dremel website during October. Like the other vibrant filament colors available for the 3D Idea Builder, our pink filament is plant-based, recyclable and renewable. Don't forget to share your awesome pink creations on social media using #Dremel3D and #PrintPink. We're looking forward to seeing what you come up with!

For more information, visit https://3dprinter.dremel.com/

Check Out the Winners of the Dremel Maker in Residence Competition

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This year, over 200 Makers across the nation entered the inaugural Maker in Residence contest. Five lucky applicants were handpicked by Dremel not only to showcase their amazing work, but also to act as advocates for the Maker Movement as a whole and inspire others to pick up Dremel tools and start making. It's time to meet your 2015-2016 Makers in Residence.

 

Haley Yurkow

 Haley is the artist behind Mississippi Mojo, specializing in gorgeous, custom, hand-etched glass objects. Her work includes everything from etchings on antique windows and barware to creating handcrafted chalkboards and refinishing furniture. Haley is also active in her community, providing free ecofriendly art activities for children at her local farmers market.

 

Celina Muire

 Celina is an Austin-based woodworker and pyrographer. Her work includes wood-burned kitchenware, as well as decorative art pieces and headboards. Celina is a major advocate for the Maker movement in Austin and shares her talent by teaching pyrography workshops.

 

Keith Hahn

 Keith creates folk art and furniture in the secluded foothills of the Big Horn Mountains. His materials of choice are iron and wood and he specializes in high-end custom log furniture as well as decorative ironwork. Keith is inspired by the beautiful natural scenery surrounding him. As a result, a lot of Keith's work reflects the colors and textures found in nature.

 

Sean Harrington

 Sean is jack of all trades who creates theatrical props and rewires old analog devices for digital interaction. Sean is driven by the desire to improve how humans interact with the tools and machines in their daily lives. He also likes using technology and engineering to make jobs easier so people will have more free time to create things they love.

 

Shaun Crockett

 Shaun has been a Maker since childhood. When he's not remodeling homes, Shaun dedicates his time to indulge in more unique projects like knife making and engine building. Shaun's work is inspired by technology and his desire to bridge the digital and physical worlds. He also has a unique vantage point as he combines the processes of art and engineering into his works.

New Dremel Metal-Cutting Wheels

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Cut more metal. Replace fewer bits.

Learn more about the two new longer-lasting cutting wheels from Dremel.

Some bits just rent space in your accessory kit, but the Dremel EZ506CU 1 1/2'' Premium Metal Cutting Wheel and 506CU 7/8" Premium Metal Cutting Wheel are moving in for the long haul.

These cutting wheels feature a super-abrasive grit called cubic boron nitride (or CBN). CBN used on a cut-off wheel allows the wheel to remain sharp longer, stay cool, and it won't shrink. These wheels last at least 20 times longer than our fiberglass-reinforced cutting wheels, based on internal testing.

Maker of the Month: Clockmaker David West

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With so many precision-cut parts working together, clockmaking can be an exercise in patience. It's been less than a year since David West began spending his time keeping time, but he's already made some extraordinary pieces. Read on to see his work, and learn more about his process and background.

It takes time to make time. But in a relatively short amount of time, David West – a master electrician by trade – has built some impressive timepieces with the help of his Dremel tools. After seeing his exhibition at Maker Faire – Bay Area, we knew David's work would inspire our community of Makers.

We asked David about his work, his inspirations and how Dremel tools help him Make.

How long have you been clockmaking, and how long into your career did you start using a Dremel?

I haven't been making clocks for long – less than 8 months by the time Dremel heard about me at the Maker Faire earlier this year. I made my first clock from a plan I purchased back in October of 2014.

I've been using Dremel tools for dozens upon dozens of years. In every project that comes to mind, pretty much any roadblock can be solved with an attachment or tool tip and a Dremel tool.

What inspired you to start clockmaking?

I can't recall a specific event that inspired me, but as long as I can remember, I have been more interested in what's on the inside of things than the thing itself. I was notorious for taking things apart. Gifts for birthdays or whatever were usually always followed with, "You're only going to take it apart." My mother or grandmother usually standing there with their arms crossed or akimbo with a disgusted look on their face. Like, we gotta get him a birthday gift, but we hate it that he doesn't at least wait a week or so before tearing it open. Hide his tools! Hide his tools!
 

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Is clockmaking a career for you, a hobby, or both?

Interesting question, as soon as I find out the answer, I'll let you know. Honestly, I have no idea, so if it makes money, then it'll become something to focus more energy on. If not, then it'll remain a fun hobby.

Making clocks isn't the only thing I make. I'm fond of LOTS of gadgets. One thing that was made clear to me during the Maker Faire: people are interested in kits and want to build things for themselves (as long as the "hard" parts are done for them, like figuring out clock- wheel ratios and the going train and all that clock stuff).

Is there a clock you've made that you're most proud of?

There is in fact a clock I'm in the process of making that I'm proud of. In Prague, there's an astronomical clock called the Orloj. I am currently designing a clock based on the astrolabe and the Orloj of Prague.

How much time do you typically spend on one of your pieces?

It's kind of embarrassing to admit, but longer than my level of patience can endure. So I require frequent breaks because my mind is very busy and it's difficult to sit still. My first clock took months to build. Then another month just to get it to tick. And even when it was ticking, it would do so in fits and starts. An excruciatingly lengthy source of frustration and insanity. But once I got over that hurdle, it has become much easier. The last clock I made took about two weeks from start to finish. And by "finish," I mean it's ticking and keeping relatively good time (it gains about a minute every 38 hours).
 

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It seems like there is a lot of math that goes into properly aligning everything. Do you have a pretty extensive math background?

My math background goes up to high school calculus (that I never use). Here's a secret the clockmakers would kill me if I revealed it, but here goes: the only extensive math you need to know is how to multiply and divide. That's it! All the algorithms involved with clock-wheel ratios and pendulum lengths have been figured out centuries ago by way smarter geniuses than me. Every bit of this information is out there and available to anyone interested enough to dig for it. In my experience, alignment of practically everything is based more by eye than strict measurement.

Clocks are picky things, so precision is crucial, but I'm making them out of wood, so there are a few areas where some things are more forgiving than others. No two clocks are ever the same, even if you're using the same set of plans or cutting them out of the same stock you used to make a previous clock happily ticking on the wall. It's very weird. I do as many things by eye as I do with a ruler. Probably more, to be honest.

Trust me, anyone with even marginal woodworking skills and some good tools can build a clock. The hard part is scraping together the patience you're going to need to get it accomplished.

Are all the components of your pieces necessary and practical, or are some things done to be "intentionally complicated?"

Truthfully, every single part serves a purpose. Nothing is wasted, especially my time. I want to make a thing that does what it's supposed to do, and no more. Adding parts increases internal friction, which is something you don't want to do to a clock. So the term "less is more" definitely applies. But you can go wild when it comes to designing wheel cut-outs and frames and cabinets for the mechanisms.
 

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About how many components typically go into one of your pieces, and about how many are created with the help of a Dremel tool?

For simple clocks, there are fewer and the more complex clocks have more, but there are between nine to seventeen gears (also called wheels and pinions), each of which are cut with the Dremel Moto-Saw. Frames and supporting structures may be cut by table saw or bandsaw, but even they find themselves under some rotating something attached to a Dremel, too. Any inside cuts are all performed on the Moto-Saw. Actually, it seems easier to list the things not touched by a Dremel tool than the other way around.
 

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Do you work exclusively on clocks, or do you use your Dremel for working on other projects as well?

I use Dremel tools for everything. I own three Dremel tools, and I would have four except a friend in New Hampshire has "borrowed" that one for years. I use Dremel tools for so many things, it has long become a part of my DNA as a craftsman, tradesman, and maker. In fact, most of the other tradesmen I know also have a Dremel something in their toolboxes and/or at home.

Which Dremel tools do you use? Are there bits or accessories that get used most frequently?

I have the 400 Series XPR kit that came with a boatload of tool tips and attachments. I've had it for such a long time, the order in which all the tips came has been mish-mashed into a sort of organized chaos. The aforementioned Moto-Saw, which I love. And an ancient Dremel tool from the early 90's (I think?) that has been dedicated to the drill-press jig and bolted to my work table. The Dremel that's missing-in-action was a cordless 8000- something and a bunch of tips.
 

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What kind of tasks does a Dremel tool help you accomplish? What are the advantages of using a Dremel over manual tools?

The kinds of tasks a Dremel tool helps me accomplish are too many to list. Most of which are a direct result of the size and shape of the Dremel tool. If what you're doing requires a longer time, you can hang the motorized part and attach a Dremel flex shaft attachment. The design is an extension of the fingertips, not just the hand. The formless thoughts and ideas lurking in the mind find shape at the tip of a rotating tool attached to a Dremel held in the hand. It's awesome.

I use mine to cut metal rods (for axles and arbors in clocks), to sand stuff, to carve stuff, to cut other stuff, to engrave, to drill tiny picky little holes into delicate stuff, to modify the shapes of things intended for one thing and repurpose them for something else. If I have to get brutal with something I can't get open but don't want to destroy what's inside, out comes the Dremel and a cutting wheel and I perform surgery without an anesthetic. I am unstoppable as long as I have my Dremel tools. And I'm always adding bits and attachments or anything I happen to see that's "cool." I may not need it at the moment of purchase, but eventually I find something to use it on.

What can I say? The only bad thing about a Dremel tool is being unfortunate enough to not have one.

User Experts Focus Group Share Your Dremel Expertise

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No one knows our tools as well as you, our users. We want your help in making our products as effective and user-friendly as possible. If you live near Tampa, FL; Palm Springs, CA; Racine, WI; Rochester, NY; San Francisco, CA; Austin, TX; or Chicago, IL, we'd especially love to meet you and enlist your help.

Apply for the User Experts Focus Group

At Dremel, we strive to intimately understand and anticipate our users' needs. We're responding with innovative services and specialty tool systems that are based on a foundation of experience, knowledge and a sincere desire to serve our users.

To ensure that we're achieving these goals, it's important to understand what part our products play in the lives of our users and develop and refine our products to best meet their needs. To accomplish this, we are developing a User Experts Focus Group in various regions across the country. We'll be meeting with these groups on a periodic basis throughout the two-year membership – either on-site or online.

We're looking for people who engage with tech/DIY projects, hobby, craft, home maintenance, repair projects, professional jobs and more. The type of projects can be very broad, such as crafts and creative hobbies, small DIY jobs, furniture-making or restoration, home improvement/maintenance, plumbing, etc. We'll be looking for users with all ability levels – from new owners to highly experienced users. Your feedback will let us know where your interests lie, so we can invite you to the appropriate focus group meeting.

User Experts members:
  • Discuss how Dremel interacts with your vocation, hobbies, projects, and passions.
  • Tell us how we can improve, where we can help you, what products you desire.
  • Tell us what other companies do that our users like or dislike.
  • Have the opportunity to test new products.
  • Might be required to answer brief surveys throughout membership.
User Experts participation:
  • A maximum of four meetings per year.
  • Meetings will cover:
    • Product evaluation and testing.
    • Communication evaluation.
    • Open discussion and sharing of information.
  • Additional projects may also consist of:
    • Various emails, phone calls or online surveys asking opinions or questions.
    • Secret shopping via phone, internet or local stores.
    • Product evaluation and testing.
User Experts incentives per year:
  • Tools, meals and/or other potential incentives not to exceed $250 value. Incentives dependent upon panel attendance and participation throughout membership.
In addition, our members tend to connect with each other to enhance product techniques, expand product knowledge and gain project tips.

If you're interested in applying for membership into our User Experts Focus Group, please take a few minutes to fill out the application form

Our First Makers-In-Residence?

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The Dremel Maker-in-Residence contest came to an end on August 25. While we sort through the entries and select our winners, check out just a few of the amazing pieces our community of Makers submitted.

Thanks to all who entered the Maker-in-Residence contest. We'll announce our winners near the end of September.

Here are some of the many impressive works submitted by Dremel users:

Akoko O. from Newport Beach, California:
 

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Aldo C. from Yakima, Washington:
 

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Brian R. from Santa Cruz, California:
 

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Caroline B. from San Pedro, California:
 

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Chris H. from Snohomish, Washington:
 

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David K. from Venice, Florida:
 

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Geert D. from Pacifica, California:
 

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Ilya A. from Phoenix, Arizona:
 

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Jackie M. from New York, New York:
 

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Jarrod B. from Chandler, Arizona:
 

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Jennifer C. from Fresno, California:
 

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Jessica P. from Madison, Alabama:
 

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Joel C. from San Antonio, Texas:
 

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Ronald M. from Westborough, Massachusetts:
 

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Scott T. from Katy, Texas:
 

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Shaun C. from Roeland Park, Kansas:
 

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Tommy S. from Springdale, Arkansas:
 

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Our winners will receive these tools to help them Make:

Multi-Max™
Saw-Max™
Ultra-Saw™
Moto-Saw™
VRT1
8220
4200
Fortiflex™
Three Accessory Kits (your choice)
3D Idea Builder
3D Filament (five reels in assorted colors)
Sprout by HP®

Maker of The Month: Luthier LeRoy Aiello

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People really trust LeRoy Aiello.

Guitar players and collectors have a spiritual connection to their instruments, so it takes a lot of faith to hand over their most prized possessions to Aiello Guitars. They're perfectly safe, though, as LeRoy's steady hand and years of experience as a luthier give him the perfect tools to breathe new life into old instruments.

And LeRoy has another precision tool at his disposal – a Dremel rotary tool.

We asked LeRoy about his career and how he uses Dremel tools in his work.

How long have you been working on guitars, and how long into your career did you start using a Dremel?

I've been repairing and restoring guitars for 30 years. I spent two years on the road as a touring tech, and then I started apprenticing at Mandolin Bros., where I was able to work on some of the finest stringed instruments around. I left there in 2010 to open Aiello Guitars.

I started using Dremel products approximately a year after I started at Mandolin Bros., which would've been in 1988.

Do you specialize in repair and maintenance, or do you also build guitars from scratch?

My specialty is restoration, but do have two designs that I will be building soon.

Do you play the guitar as well? If so, which came first, your interest in playing guitars or your interest in repairing guitars?

I started playing guitar before I gained an interest in the technical side of the instrument. I wanted to know how the instrument worked, so I could make adjustments to my own guitars. Once I started to learn the basics, the floodgates opened up and I was hooked.

What motivated you to start working on guitars yourself, rather than sending them off to someone else for maintenance and/or repairs?

At the time, the repairmen I was using were very good, but they weren't players. They had a technical knowledge of the guitar, but not the understanding that a "general" adjustment doesn't work for everyone. You have to know your customer and equally know their style and instrument.

Do you work exclusively on guitars, or do you use your Dremel for working on other string instruments as well?

I work on mandolins as well. I use the Dremel for replacing inlays in fingerboards and cutting precise slots in bridges.

Which Dremel rotary tool(s) do you use? Are there bits or accessories that get used most frequently?

Currently I use a Dremel 4000 and a Dremel Fortiflex. I use the engraving cutters and the polishing brushes and wheels.

What kind of tasks does a Dremel rotary tool help you accomplish? What are the advantages of using a Dremel over manual tools?

I use the Dremel 4000 for cutting slots in the fingerboard to put frets in properly. I also use it with a base attachment to cut precise slots in acoustic guitar bridges to make a snug fit for the saddle. The Fortiflex is great for the artistic work. When I replace an inlay in a guitar or mandolin from the 1900s or even earlier, I have so much control over the cutter. I feel like an artist with a brush. I still use manual tools to clean a fret slot here and there, but the Dremel is precision, pure and simple.

Are there any tasks in which you could use a Dremel, but you still prefer to use a manual tool?

Before the Dremel was available, cleaning slots in the fingerboard to the right depth and thickness was done with a hand saw. Even if you put a stop on the saw, it's still not perfect, and it's time-consuming. There's no guesswork when the Dremel is in play.

Learn more about LeRoy and his lutherie work at AielloGuitars.com.

Dremel Maker-In-Residence

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Like you, we love to make. That's why we've been supporting Makers of all kinds since 1932. Now we're looking for a few truly passionate Makers. People who push their craft. People who can inspire not only our products, but also the entire Maker community.

Tell us why you'd make a great Maker in Residence. We want to hear about your passion for making, whether you mod computer cases, handcraft guitars or make puppets. Just fill out a questionnaire and share a few pics of your work. Entries will be accepted through Aug. 25, 2015.

Click here to enter and see the official rules.

What You'll Win
Along with the tools and products listed below, you'll have a chance to collaborate with Dremel, access the Dremel platform to share your projects and a chance to honor outstanding work from the Maker community.

Multi-Max™
Saw-Max™
Ultra-Saw™
Moto-Saw™
VRT1
8220
4200
Fortiflex™
Three Accessory Kits (your choice)
3D Idea Builder
3D Filament (five reels in assorted colors)
Sprout by HP®

Cut-out the Clean-up™ Dremel Launches New VRT1

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In an effort to improve workspace cleanliness, Dremel has introduced the new VRT1, a shop-vacuum-powered rotary tool that cleans debris while in operation. As the only dustless rotary tool, it is designed to “Cut-Out the Clean-Up™” involved with dusty projects in drywall, wood, glass, ceramic and a variety of similar dust-producing materials.
 

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The VRT1 connects with 1-1/4” wet/dry vacuum hoses and adapters, which provide suction to power the tool and collect debris. Ports on the front of the VRT1 take in air via the vacuum to spin the rotary function and remove airborne dust and debris. With power similar to a 4.8V cordless rotary tool, the VRT1 can be used with a wet/dry vacuum with 110 CFM or greater.
 

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Best for small, dusty projects, the VRT1 features an ergonomic design and compatibility with most standard Dremel rotary tool accessories. Whether etching, sanding, carving or drilling, the VRT1 gives users an efficient rotary tool that eliminates cleanup.
 

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The Dremel VRT1 is available online, and find it in-store at Lowe’s beginning in August (MSRP $29.99 USD). For more information, visit www.dremel.com.

Tip the Scales in your favor with the Right Tools

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Adam Glickman isn’t your average musky fisherman, and we’re not just talking about his 85-90% land rate. Adam is the first to say that the right approach to musky fishing is nothing without the right tools. Thanks to the Dremel 7300 MiniMite, Adam has a true edge – the sharpest hooks around.

Adam was introduced to the Dremel brand as a young teen when he received his first rotary tool as a Christmas gift from his parents. It wasn’t long before the Wisconsin native and avid fisherman grew tired of traditional flat hook files and decided to give his Dremel a whirl. Twenty years (and MANY successful catches) later, the charismatic host of Honest Musky Television sat down with the Dremel team to share more about how he’s spreading the word.

“Muskies are known for holding tight to rocks, woods and dense weed beds,” Adam said. “Even the most premium fish hooks are never sharp enough. They’re quickly dulled when working against these covers. Hooks require regular touch-ups and sharpening.”

Recognizing that so much effort went into the strike, Adam wasn’t comfortable settling for the lucky bite. In other words, that average 50% hook rate didn’t fly with him.

“Speed, accuracy, technique – none of these things matter if the musky just nudges at your hook and moves on,” Adam said. “It’s unacceptable to me to lose half of the fish I hook. I’m going to do everything I can to increase my odds.”

Adam has lost one fish so far this year and typically only a few each season. He attributes this success to regular sharpening with the Dremel MiniMite.

“Like anything you want to excel at, it takes time and practice to get it right,” Adam said. “Musky fishing isn’t easy! When I show people the before and after hooks at trade shows and seminars, they are blown away by the difference the Dremel tool sharpening makes. Seeing is believing.”

Watch Adam’s technique for sharpening his hooks using the Dremel 952 Aluminum Oxide Grinding Stone bit.
 


To learn more, visit Honest Musky Television or follow them on Facebook.

Makers Gonna Make: Dremel Shows and Tells at Maker Faire Bay Area

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Maker Faire Bay Area, The Greatest Show and Tell on Earth, brought together Makers from all over the world, covering all walks of life and all media. The results, not surprisingly, were a master class in Making. And Dremel was in the middle of the fun.
 

Maker Faire Bay area opened with a surge of excitement. Literally.

When the gates opened in San Mateo, California at 1 p.m. Friday, May 15, throngs of students and educators flooded the Events Center. The 2015 Maker Faire Bay Area, affectionately followed on Twitter as #MFBA15, kicked off with early access to industry sponsors as well as educators and school groups. So, you can imagine that the thousands of little makers-in-the-making led the charge into the exhibitor areas.

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Dremel was prepared. Dremel brought tools. And, we let imaginations run wild. With two projects on tap for the big weekend, Dremel was sure to make memories for Maker Faire attendees.

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Project 1: Dremel Derby Cars


We're proud to say that thousands of little hands spent time making Dremel derby cars. This maker project was a simple build process that used familiar (and some of the most popular) Dremel tools: the Dremel Moto-Saw (for cutting the wood), Dremel WorkStation (for drilling the holes for the axles), and the Dremel 8050 Micro (for sanding and shaping the derby car to perfection). Of course, we'd be remiss if we didn't point out the huge role that the Dremel 3D Idea Builder 3D Printer played in all this. Each of the four derby car templates, which were used to trace the desired car's shape to the pine block, was designed and printed with the Dremel 3D Idea Builder. The cars' wheels became the Maker's choice – red or blue wheels which were also printed in either Dremel Blue or Racecar Red color options.

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Project 2: Etched Leather Bracelets

We're also proud to report that, during the full course of Maker Faire Bay Area, Makers created over two thousand leather bracelets. Attendees were able to design their own leather bracelet, but most Makers (in true Maker style) made a bracelet for someone else.

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On the social front, Dremel brought a custom-built photo frame to make the ultimate Maker Faire photo booth, and further encouraged attendees to snap a photo using the hashtag #DremelMaker for their chance to win a new Dremel 3D Idea Builder 3D printer.

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Throughout the Maker Faire experience, Dremel President John Kavanagh, could be found chatting it up with attendees about the future of Dremel and 3D printing.

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While it was evident that we enjoyed ourselves at Maker Faire Bay Area, we also had some tremendous partners who were also displaying and demonstrating the Dremel 3D Idea Builder – Autodesk and Sprout by HP.

We even brought our little friend, AJ the frog, to meet MegaBot at the Autodesk exhibit.

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Where else can you find this range of artists, tinkerers, engineers, robot-lovers and pyro-technicians all in one place but in the heart of the region best known for innovation? Maker Faire is a truly immersive experience for Makers of all kinds. We're already looking forward to our next trip to Maker Faire New York.

 

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